Multidisciplinary Interpretation of Seismic Models

Seismic models are used to place constraints on the physical and chemical state of the rocks inside the Earth. Data sets from other disciplines, such as geochemistry and mineral physics, provide independent and complementary information about the planet’s interior. Interpreting them together allows a more complete understanding.

 

Mantle temperature beneath mid-ocean ridges

 

We jointly analyzed the axial depths of ocean ridges and the composition of mid-ocean-ridge basalts together with mantle seismic velocity to show that all three data sets are consistent with temperature variations of 200-250oC to depths of at least 300 km beneath ridges (Dalton et al., Science, 2014; Gale et al., J. Pet., 2014). Our study, the first comprehensive global comparison of these observations, also showed that anomalously hot ridge segments are located near hot spots, confirming a deep mantle-plume origin for hot spot volcanism.

 

 

Interpretation of attenuation models

 

Jointly interpreting attenuation and velocity models allows more definite conclusions to be drawn about the temperature, composition, and melt and volatile content of the mantle. I used laboratory measurements on the temperature sensitivity of seismic velocity and attenuation to estimate upper-mantle temperatures from global models of seismic velocity and attenuation (Dalton et al., EPSL, 2009; Dalton and Faul, Lithos, 2010). We showed that temperature variations beneath the ocean basins are 200-250oC and that the seismic properties of continental cratons at depths < 250 km cannot be explained by temperature alone.

 

 

Multidisciplinary Interpretation of Seismic Models

Seismic models are used to place constraints on the physical and chemical state of the rocks inside the Earth. Data sets from other disciplines, such as geochemistry and mineral physics, provide independent and complementary information about the planet’s interior. Interpreting them together allows a more complete understanding.

 

Mantle temperature beneath mid-ocean ridges

 

We jointly analyzed the axial depths of ocean ridges and the composition of mid-ocean-ridge basalts together with mantle seismic velocity to show that all three data sets are consistent with temperature variations of 200-250oC to depths of at least 300 km beneath ridges (Dalton et al., Science, 2014; Gale et al., J. Pet., 2014). Our study, the first comprehensive global comparison of these observations, also showed that anomalously hot ridge segments are located near hot spots, confirming a deep mantle-plume origin for hot spot volcanism.

 

 

Interpretation of attenuation models

 

Jointly interpreting attenuation and velocity models allows more definite conclusions to be drawn about the temperature, composition, and melt and volatile content of the mantle. I used laboratory measurements on the temperature sensitivity of seismic velocity and attenuation to estimate upper-mantle temperatures from global models of seismic velocity and attenuation (Dalton et al., EPSL, 2009; Dalton and Faul, Lithos, 2010). We showed that temperature variations beneath the ocean basins are 200-250oC and that the seismic properties of continental cratons at depths < 250 km cannot be explained by temperature alone.

 

 

Multidisciplinary Interpretation of Seismic Models

Seismic models are used to place constraints on the physical and chemical state of the rocks inside the Earth. Data sets from other disciplines, such as geochemistry and mineral physics, provide independent and complementary information about the planet’s interior. Interpreting them together allows a more complete understanding.

 

Mantle temperature beneath mid-ocean ridges

 

We jointly analyzed the axial depths of ocean ridges and the composition of mid-ocean-ridge basalts together with mantle seismic velocity to show that all three data sets are consistent with temperature variations of 200-250oC to depths of at least 300 km beneath ridges (Dalton et al., Science, 2014; Gale et al., J. Pet., 2014). Our study, the first comprehensive global comparison of these observations, also showed that anomalously hot ridge segments are located near hot spots, confirming a deep mantle-plume origin for hot spot volcanism.

 

 

Interpretation of attenuation models

 

Jointly interpreting attenuation and velocity models allows more definite conclusions to be drawn about the temperature, composition, and melt and volatile content of the mantle. I used laboratory measurements on the temperature sensitivity of seismic velocity and attenuation to estimate upper-mantle temperatures from global models of seismic velocity and attenuation (Dalton et al., EPSL, 2009; Dalton and Faul, Lithos, 2010). We showed that temperature variations beneath the ocean basins are 200-250oC and that the seismic properties of continental cratons at depths < 250 km cannot be explained by temperature alone.

 

 

Multidisciplinary Interpretation of Seismic Models

Seismic models are used to place constraints on the physical and chemical state of the rocks inside the Earth. Data sets from other disciplines, such as geochemistry and mineral physics, provide independent and complementary information about the planet’s interior. Interpreting them together allows a more complete understanding.

 

Mantle temperature beneath mid-ocean ridges

 

We jointly analyzed the axial depths of ocean ridges and the composition of mid-ocean-ridge basalts together with mantle seismic velocity to show that all three data sets are consistent with temperature variations of 200-250oC to depths of at least 300 km beneath ridges (Dalton et al., Science, 2014; Gale et al., J. Pet., 2014). Our study, the first comprehensive global comparison of these observations, also showed that anomalously hot ridge segments are located near hot spots, confirming a deep mantle-plume origin for hot spot volcanism.

 

 

Interpretation of attenuation models

 

Jointly interpreting attenuation and velocity models allows more definite conclusions to be drawn about the temperature, composition, and melt and volatile content of the mantle. I used laboratory measurements on the temperature sensitivity of seismic velocity and attenuation to estimate upper-mantle temperatures from global models of seismic velocity and attenuation (Dalton et al., EPSL, 2009; Dalton and Faul, Lithos, 2010). We showed that temperature variations beneath the ocean basins are 200-250oC and that the seismic properties of continental cratons at depths < 250 km cannot be explained by temperature alone.