TEACHING

Courses Offered at Brown University

 

GEOL1610 Solid Earth Geophysics

A survey of basic geophysical techniques for determining the structure and dynamics of Earth's interior. Topics include: global structure from seismic waves; gravity, magnetic field, and shape of the Earth; thermal processes within the Earth; structure of continental and oceanic lithosphere.

 

Broadly stated, the goal of this course is to understand the physical processes at work in the Earth’s interior. These processes produce mountains, oceans, volcanoes, and earthquakes, and in general make the Earth an interesting planet. In order to understand these processes, we must use observations and methods that sample below the surface. This course is focused on the geophysical observations and methods that provide constraints on the properties of and processes occurring within the interior of the Earth. We will cover the different types of geophysical observations and methods, including how the observations are made, how the observations can be used, and underlying theoretical basis.

 

Colleen taught this class in Fall 2014 and Spring 2016.

 

 

GEOL2920S Seminar on Continental Cratons

The focus of this course is the formation, evolution, and structure of continental cratons. These topics are explored through a survey of the observational constraints on cratons, including seismology, gravity, heat flow, geochemistry, and petrology. The use of dynamical models to investigate the assembly, destruction, and long-term stability of cratons is also considered.

 

Colleen taught this class in Spring 2015.

 

 

GEOL 0160M First Year Seminar on Natural Disasters

This First Year Seminar explores natural disasters: the physical processes that cause them, and their effects on human life. Types of natural disasters covered include earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis, hurricanes, tornadoes, and floods. The focus of the course is case studies of specific disasters, allowing us to discuss both the science of natural hazards and the vulnerability of human populations to those hazards.

 

The course provides a broad overview of the Earth Sciences, including geology and geophysics, meteorology, oceanography, and climatology. We also address questions such as: How do factors like emergency preparedness and response, construction methods, infrastructure, and poverty level determine the outcome of a particular disaster? How has the demographic population shift toward coastal areas affected the disaster risk? Finally, we acknowledge the increasingly important role that humans play in contributing to certain “natural” hazards, for example earthquakes induced by reservoirs and wastewater-injection wells, and the impact of greenhouse gases and warming on severe weather and coastal erosion.

 

Colleen offered this class for the first time in Fall 2016.

 

 

GEOL2920Y Seminar on Melting and Melt Distribution in the Mantle

The focus of this course is melting and melt distribution in the Earth's mantle. The seminar addresses the following topics: melt generation and migration, flow in porous media, geochemical constraints on the melting process, and geophysical constraints on melt distribution. We consider the evidence for and processes of melt generation, distribution, transport, and extraction at various tectonic settings including, but not limited to, mid-ocean ridges, subduction zones, and hotspots.

 

Colleen is co-teaching this class with Profs. Chris Huber, Yan Liang, and Marc Parmentier in Spring 2017.

 

 

 

 

TEACHING

Courses Offered at Brown University

 

GEOL1610 Solid Earth Geophysics

A survey of basic geophysical techniques for determining the structure and dynamics of Earth's interior. Topics include: global structure from seismic waves; gravity, magnetic field, and shape of the Earth; thermal processes within the Earth; structure of continental and oceanic lithosphere.

 

Broadly stated, the goal of this course is to understand the physical processes at work in the Earth’s interior. These processes produce mountains, oceans, volcanoes, and earthquakes, and in general make the Earth an interesting planet. In order to understand these processes, we must use observations and methods that sample below the surface. This course is focused on the geophysical observations and methods that provide constraints on the properties of and processes occurring within the interior of the Earth. We will cover the different types of geophysical observations and methods, including how the observations are made, how the observations can be used, and underlying theoretical basis.

 

Colleen taught this class in Fall 2014 and Spring 2016.

 

 

GEOL2920S Seminar on Continental Cratons

The focus of this course is the formation, evolution, and structure of continental cratons. These topics are explored through a survey of the observational constraints on cratons, including seismology, gravity, heat flow, geochemistry, and petrology. The use of dynamical models to investigate the assembly, destruction, and long-term stability of cratons is also considered.

 

Colleen taught this class in Spring 2015.

 

 

GEOL 0160M First Year Seminar on Natural Disasters

This First Year Seminar explores natural disasters: the physical processes that cause them, and their effects on human life. Types of natural disasters covered include earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis, hurricanes, tornadoes, and floods. The focus of the course is case studies of specific disasters, allowing us to discuss both the science of natural hazards and the vulnerability of human populations to those hazards.

 

The course provides a broad overview of the Earth Sciences, including geology and geophysics, meteorology, oceanography, and climatology. We also address questions such as: How do factors like emergency preparedness and response, construction methods, infrastructure, and poverty level determine the outcome of a particular disaster? How has the demographic population shift toward coastal areas affected the disaster risk? Finally, we acknowledge the increasingly important role that humans play in contributing to certain “natural” hazards, for example earthquakes induced by reservoirs and wastewater-injection wells, and the impact of greenhouse gases and warming on severe weather and coastal erosion.

 

Colleen offered this class for the first time in Fall 2016.

 

 

GEOL2920Y Seminar on Melting and Melt Distribution in the Mantle

The focus of this course is melting and melt distribution in the Earth's mantle. The seminar addresses the following topics: melt generation and migration, flow in porous media, geochemical constraints on the melting process, and geophysical constraints on melt distribution. We consider the evidence for and processes of melt generation, distribution, transport, and extraction at various tectonic settings including, but not limited to, mid-ocean ridges, subduction zones, and hotspots.

 

Colleen is co-teaching this class with Profs. Chris Huber, Yan Liang, and Marc Parmentier in Spring 2017.

 

 

 

 

Courses Offered at Brown University

 

GEOL1610 Solid Earth Geophysics

A survey of basic geophysical techniques for determining the structure and dynamics of Earth's interior. Topics include: global structure from seismic waves; gravity, magnetic field, and shape of the Earth; thermal processes within the Earth; structure of continental and oceanic lithosphere.

 

Broadly stated, the goal of this course is to understand the physical processes at work in the Earth’s interior. These processes produce mountains, oceans, volcanoes, and earthquakes, and in general make the Earth an interesting planet. In order to understand these processes, we must use observations and methods that sample below the surface. This course is focused on the geophysical observations and methods that provide constraints on the properties of and processes occurring within the interior of the Earth. We will cover the different types of geophysical observations and methods, including how the observations are made, how the observations can be used, and underlying theoretical basis.

 

Colleen taught this class in Fall 2014 and Spring 2016.

 

 

GEOL2920S Seminar on Continental Cratons

The focus of this course is the formation, evolution, and structure of continental cratons. These topics are explored through a survey of the observational constraints on cratons, including seismology, gravity, heat flow, geochemistry, and petrology. The use of dynamical models to investigate the assembly, destruction, and long-term stability of cratons is also considered.

 

Colleen taught this class in Spring 2015.

 

 

GEOL 0160M First Year Seminar on Natural Disasters

This First Year Seminar explores natural disasters: the physical processes that cause them, and their effects on human life. Types of natural disasters covered include earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis, hurricanes, tornadoes, and floods. The focus of the course is case studies of specific disasters, allowing us to discuss both the science of natural hazards and the vulnerability of human populations to those hazards.

 

The course provides a broad overview of the Earth Sciences, including geology and geophysics, meteorology, oceanography, and climatology. We also address questions such as: How do factors like emergency preparedness and response, construction methods, infrastructure, and poverty level determine the outcome of a particular disaster? How has the demographic population shift toward coastal areas affected the disaster risk? Finally, we acknowledge the increasingly important role that humans play in contributing to certain “natural” hazards, for example earthquakes induced by reservoirs and wastewater-injection wells, and the impact of greenhouse gases and warming on severe weather and coastal erosion.

 

Colleen offered this class for the first time in Fall 2016.

 

 

GEOL2920Y Seminar on Melting and Melt Distribution in the Mantle

The focus of this course is melting and melt distribution in the Earth's mantle. The seminar addresses the following topics: melt generation and migration, flow in porous media, geochemical constraints on the melting process, and geophysical constraints on melt distribution. We consider the evidence for and processes of melt generation, distribution, transport, and extraction at various tectonic settings including, but not limited to, mid-ocean ridges, subduction zones, and hotspots.

 

Colleen is co-teaching this class with Profs. Chris Huber, Yan Liang, and Marc Parmentier in Spring 2017.

 

 

 

 

Courses Offered at Brown University

 

GEOL1610 Solid Earth Geophysics

A survey of basic geophysical techniques for determining the structure and dynamics of Earth's interior. Topics include: global structure from seismic waves; gravity, magnetic field, and shape of the Earth; thermal processes within the Earth; structure of continental and oceanic lithosphere.

 

Broadly stated, the goal of this course is to understand the physical processes at work in the Earth’s interior. These processes produce mountains, oceans, volcanoes, and earthquakes, and in general make the Earth an interesting planet. In order to understand these processes, we must use observations and methods that sample below the surface. This course is focused on the geophysical observations and methods that provide constraints on the properties of and processes occurring within the interior of the Earth. We will cover the different types of geophysical observations and methods, including how the observations are made, how the observations can be used, and underlying theoretical basis.

 

Colleen taught this class in Fall 2014 and Spring 2016.

 

 

GEOL2920S Seminar on Continental Cratons

The focus of this course is the formation, evolution, and structure of continental cratons. These topics are explored through a survey of the observational constraints on cratons, including seismology, gravity, heat flow, geochemistry, and petrology. The use of dynamical models to investigate the assembly, destruction, and long-term stability of cratons is also considered.

 

Colleen taught this class in Spring 2015.

 

 

GEOL 0160M First Year Seminar on Natural Disasters

This First Year Seminar explores natural disasters: the physical processes that cause them, and their effects on human life. Types of natural disasters covered include earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis, hurricanes, tornadoes, and floods. The focus of the course is case studies of specific disasters, allowing us to discuss both the science of natural hazards and the vulnerability of human populations to those hazards.

 

The course provides a broad overview of the Earth Sciences, including geology and geophysics, meteorology, oceanography, and climatology. We also address questions such as: How do factors like emergency preparedness and response, construction methods, infrastructure, and poverty level determine the outcome of a particular disaster? How has the demographic population shift toward coastal areas affected the disaster risk? Finally, we acknowledge the increasingly important role that humans play in contributing to certain “natural” hazards, for example earthquakes induced by reservoirs and wastewater-injection wells, and the impact of greenhouse gases and warming on severe weather and coastal erosion.

 

Colleen offered this class for the first time in Fall 2016.

 

 

GEOL2920Y Seminar on Melting and Melt Distribution in the Mantle

The focus of this course is melting and melt distribution in the Earth's mantle. The seminar addresses the following topics: melt generation and migration, flow in porous media, geochemical constraints on the melting process, and geophysical constraints on melt distribution. We consider the evidence for and processes of melt generation, distribution, transport, and extraction at various tectonic settings including, but not limited to, mid-ocean ridges, subduction zones, and hotspots.

 

Colleen is co-teaching this class with Profs. Chris Huber, Yan Liang, and Marc Parmentier in Spring 2017.

 

 

 

 

TEACHING